Iris Power GuardII

Continuous Online Monitoring of Multiple Sensor Technologies
 

Iris Power GuardII is a continuous online monitoring of Partial Discharge, Rotor magnetic flux, Stator end-winding vibration and shaft voltagentinuous Online Monitoring of Multiple Sensor Technologies

Hydro Generator
Turbine Generator
Works with These Assets

Feature

Monitoring and diagnostic capabilities for up to 3 technologies including:

  1. Partial Discharge (PD)
  2. Stator winding insulation
  3. Rotor magnetic flux
  4. Stator endwinding vibration
  5. Shaft voltage and current monitoring
  • Combined with the Iris Application Manager (IAM), data can be collected from multiple rotating machines which can be monitored continuously at a given time.
  • Modbus over Ethernet protocol included for interfacing to third party applications
  • Packages includes sensors, instrument, penetration, cables.

Options

Options for data acquisition from:

  • Iris Power Endwinding vibration single axis sensors
  • Iris Power Endwinding vibration dual axis sensors
  • Third party vibration sensors
  • Iris Power flux probes (TFProbe and FFProbe)
  • Flux type S

Service includes

  • Installation
  • Commissioning
  • Training

Group Created with Sketch. Application

  • Maximize Time between Outages: Using Condition based maintenance, equipment is removed from service less frequently (it is only done if condition of machine is deteriorated) as compared to the other maintenance schemes.
  • Lower Repair Costs: Repair costs in detecting problems at an early stage are often only 1% of the cost incurred if failure occurs during normal operation of an asset .
  • Reduce risk of catastrophic Failures: Maximize revenue from the generator by reducing risk of catastrophic asset failures and schedule maintenance activities to minimize outage cost.
  • Continuously monitor a large range of turbogenerators to diagnose stator and rotor related conditions and increase the life of the assets
  • Reliable and repeatable PD, flux and endwinding vibration measurements with a low probability of false alarms